The Conversation

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The Conversation's Latest Articles

Features

John Kinsella on creative collaboration

The complexity and rewards of co-writing poetry across oceans and cultures.

Features

How Eurovision helps define Europe’s boundaries (and why Ukraine will likely win)

Robert Deam Tobin gives a geo-political context as to how Ukraine’s 2022 entry could be heading for Eurovision success.

Features

Australia needs universal basic income for artists

Ireland has recently instituted a new scheme to pay artists an universal basic income, here’s what that would look like…

Features

We need more time to experiment and fail at work

Creativity and innovation will flourish if staff are given more time to imagine and experiment, argues Maroš Servátka.

Features

Libraries around the world safeguard Ukrainian culture

Librarians and libraries across the world play a role in preserving and sharing Ukraine’s cultural history.

Page with book review written on it with scrumpled paper and typewriter beside it
Features

What makes a perfect book review?

What are the rules of reviewing books? Ronan McDonald looks at the thorny cultural landscape of the contemporary criticism.

Features

Vale The Saints' Chris Bailey

John Willsteed pays tribute to Chris Bailey, a 'gentleman with the mad soul of an Irish convict poet’ and acknowledges…

Features

Hannah Gadsby on being an autistic queer comedian

RMIT PhD candidate Clem Bastow discusses comedian Hannah Gadsby’s new book, Ten Steps to Nanette, and how it relates her…

Features

Australian writing and publishing faces ‘grinding austerity’

‘When it comes to public funding, literature has long been the poor cousin of the arts,’ wrote Ben Eltham on…

Features

Why Australia needs a national Ministry for Culture

Australia needs to mature as a nation by taking its arts and culture seriously, writes Jo Caust.

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