Pamela See

Pamela See (Xue Mei-Ling) is a Brisbane-based an artist and writer. During her Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) from Griffith University, she researched post-digital applications for traditional Chinese papercutting. Since 1997, she has exhibited across Europe, Asia, North America and Australia. The collections to house examples of her artwork include: the Huaxia Papercutting Museum in Changsha, the National Gallery of Australia (NGA) in Canberra and the Art Gallery of South Australia (AGSA) in Adelaide. She has also contributed to variety of publications such as: the Information, Medium and Society Journal of Publishing, M/C Journal, Art Education Australia, 716 Craft and Design and Garland Magazine.

Pamela's Latest Articles

Installation view, 'Dawn Ng: Avalanche', Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane, 2024. Image: Courtesy of the artist and Sullivan+Strumpf. Photo: Carl Warner. A video still against a black background that depicts a ice block coloured in different shades and melting.
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Exhibition review: Dawn Ng: Avalanche, Institute of Modern Art

A single-channel video that can evoke different emotions and interpretations.

1WORKROOM9 occupies the previous space of Chinese Fraternity Association of Queensland. Photo: ArtsHub. A glass door with white timbre borders opens into a corridor. On the top of the door is a sign with ‘1WORKROOM9’, in the door itself is a row of letters stuck on, displaying ‘CHINESE FRATERNITY ASSOCIATION OF QUEENSLAND INC’
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Opening of new project space in old Chinatown Mall fosters speculation into the past

1WORKROOM9's inaugural exhibition transports viewers back in time – to not only Archie Moore's adolescence but also to the contentious…

From Robert MacPherson to Callum Morton, 'Halfway' showcases some of the finest artists our country has produced since the beginning of the 20th century. Photo: ArtsHub.
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Exhibition review: Halfway, Yarrila Arts and Museum

Yarrila Arts and Museum is geographically positioned at a midpoint between Meanjin/Brisbane and Eora/Sydney – hence the name of this…

Donna Marcus mesmerises audiences with the mass and variety of vintage cookware she collected, sorted and assembled. 'Radiate' installation view at HOTA. Photo: ArtsHub. Red, blue and silver wall sculptures made of aluminium parts and arranged in different patterns arranged on a white wall.
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Exhibition review: Donna Marcus, Radiate, HOTA

An exhibition that reflects the integral role women have played in feeding the growth of Australia as a nation since…

Hiromi Tango demonstrating the ritual wearing of all donated items prior to her incorporating parts of them into her installations during a workshop at Museum of Brisbane in October 2023. Photo: ArtsHub.
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Full spectrum: the broad-reaching appeal of Hiromi Tango

Japanese Australian artist Hiromi Tango brings together knowledge embedded in rituals with ancient origins and scientific innovation to create sites…

Each, Other. Image is a large pink walled gallery space with photographs on the walls.
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Exhibition review: Each, Other, Griffith University Art Museum (GUAM)

‘Each, Other’ offers a compelling insight into the experiences of two photographers born in the wake of China's Open Door…

Short Shelf Life. Suzanne Knight. Image depicts green tapestry with a white butterfly in the centre.
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Exhibition review: Short Shelf Life, Tactile Arts

In the beginning of the wet season, Tactile Arts is exhibiting an absorbing exhibition of tapestries by its artist-in-residence Suzanne…

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Exhibition review: Paul Bai, Pestorius Sweeney House

An understated exhibition set in Queensland suburbia speaks volumes about the state in which we live.

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Artists highlight the heightening issue of homelessness among women

Artists bring home the plight of older Australian women amid the housing crisis.

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Exhibition review: Troy-Anthony Baylis, QUT Art Museum

’I Wanna Be Adorned’ by Troy-Anthony Baylis offers artefacts for generations of Australians to come.

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