The end of Catalyst: four ironies

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Julian Meyrick

We need to understand the failure of Catalyst in more complex terms than a zero-sum game of winners and losers.

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An oft-occurring phrase in Peter Temple’s award-willing crime novel, Truth, is “moving on”. Characters say it when they want to change the subject, or there doesn’t seem much more to say about a subject, or when they can’t bear to talk about a subject any longer. In the book, the truth is a thing to be avoided at all costs. Moving on is a synonym for looking away. The Conversation

About the author

Julian Meyrick is Professor of Creative Arts at Flinders University.