A Bl**dy Brief History of Swearing: Melbourne International Comedy Festival

Melbourne International Comedy Festival's A Bl**dy Brief History of Swearing is one man's attempt to discover why a handful of words in the English language still has the power to shock, offend and amuse in equal measure.
A Bl**dy Brief History of Swearing: Melbourne International Comedy Festival
A Bl**dy Brief History of Swearing: Melbourne International Comedy Festival A Bl**dy Brief History of Swearing is one man's attempt to discover why a handful of words in the English language still has the power to shock, offend and amuse in equal measure. In this stand up show, UK comedian Alexis Dubus attempts to uncover the science of swearing with facts fables and why the f#&k we do it in the first place. Starting with the cerebral cortex and how swear words are formed, Dubus takes us on a comical journey into the finer points of how swear words are phonetically formed, how they remain intact in the brain – even if we have had a brain injury - and how they are used on a daily basis. According to www.squidoo.com most expletives are used for psychological reasons. Cussing makes us feel better and swearing gives us a channel to express our rage or pain thus relieving some of the pressure. Strangely, the birth of swear words in most languages can be found in religion. The words profanity, blasphemy, and oath all relate to invocation of some deity or another. At one point in our history we believed that God was hearing every word we uttered, so promises were sealed with phrases such as may God strike me down or God blind me (which is the origin of Blimey). Let’s face it, unless you are a real saint, we all swear. And while F**K and C**T might be your favourites, or you believe they are acronyms for something else, there are a whole host of other swear words out there that you may not even be familiar with. If you are feeling really creative, you could make up your own swear words and one day hear them being used as you walk down some random street. But be warned; don’t go around intimidating people or the following might just happen to you. An American Senator, one Senator Sanatorum found that pissing off the gay community didn’t help his anti-gay point of view one little bit. Instead of the gay community running in fear of his propaganda, they created a new gay slang word out of his name. Now a Sanatorum is a term used for a mixture of lube and fecal matter. Even if you don’t swear, do yourself a favour, go and see A Bl**dy Brief History of Swearing. It’s funny, educational and you will get a free swearing badge at the end – wear it lout, wear it proud and swear like there is no tomorrow. A Bl**dy Brief History of Swearing: Melbourne International Comedy Festival Date: 2 - 25 April Times: Thu-Sat 11pm Duration: 60 minutes Venue: Trades Hall - Old Council Chambers 2 Lygon St, Carlton Sth Prices: Full $20 Concession $18 Group (6 or more) $19 Preview $18 Laugh Pack $18 Bookings: Ticketmaster 1300 660 013 Venue Bookings 9775 3797 & at the door Wheelchair access

Melynda von Derksen

Monday 20 April, 2009

About the author

Melynda is a Melbourne based freelance photographer, arts manager and fashion stylist who enjoys creating her own projects and reinventing herself on a continual basis. Graduating from the Victorian College of the Arts in 1996 where she majored in technical production in theatre, she has worked as a lighting designer, stage manager and theatre all rounder for many of Melbourne's best known creative companies. Eager to expand on her professional career, in 2004 she undertook a post graduate degree in arts management at the University of Melbourne. Since then she has worked in the area of arts administration and has used her skills to coordinate many successful cabaret events around town. As well as being part of the La Mama family for almost a decade, she continues to stick her finger in every type of creative pie that life has to offer. She is currently researching and writing a photographic book based on the history of the Melbourne Punk scene (1977 - onwards), which she hopes will be published in the next few years.