ADELAIDE FRINGE FESTIVAL REVIEW: Pie Charts and Panties

Adelaide Fringe Festival's Pie Charts and Panties is an aptly named, two part Adelaide Fringe Festival show. Pie Charts and Panties juxtaposes the mediocrity of administration against the flair and flamboyance of French burlesque, expressing it all through dance and physical theatre.
ADELAIDE FRINGE FESTIVAL REVIEW: Pie Charts and Panties
Adelaide Fringe Festival: Pie Charts and Panties An aptly named, two part Adelaide Fringe Festival show, Pie Charts and Panties juxtaposes the mediocrity of administration against the flair and flamboyance of French burlesque, expressing it all through dance and physical theatre. The first part of the double bill is 7 Habits of Highly Effective Pie Chart. This piece is theatrical and focuses on the concept of working in an office environment. In this performance we see power struggles between employees and the effects of working in a repetitive job. 7 Habits of Highly Effective Pie Charts is broken into several parts, taken from a book of the same name by Steven Covey, which includes motivational sayings popular with middle management, and essentially titles each of the scenes. This performance contains cleverly written dialogue that splices office lingo with stationary quips. There is an interesting use of metaphor however the literary innuendo may have left some people wondering if they were hearing what they thought they were hearing. The physical theatre in this performance was effective in relaying the inner office power struggles and the handshake acrobats were highly entertaining however some of the ‘darker sides’ of the performance were perhaps a little too dark, and may have been confusing to those who haven’t ever worked in that kind of office environment. The counter balance to 7 Habits of Highly Effective Pie Charts, and the stronger of the double bill was Frilly Knickers. Beginning with a suggestive routine highlighted by stark red light that was reminiscent of Performance Art, the show moved into high kicks and cheeky dancing. This was much more lively and captivating and focused on the dance combinations and the visual dynamic rather than social themes. As its name suggests, Frilly Knickers is more physical and suggestive, drawing on the burlesque elements of the Moulin Rouge combined with more contemporary dance styles. There is strong duet partner work as well as some gymnastic visual slapstick amongst the men which was entertaining. Frilly Knickers ended with a vigorous Can Can in true skirt flicking style to up beat music. These performances were entertaining and lively, however need some tightening in the production side in the way of introducing the acts and intermission and closing the show, so the audience isn’t left sitting and wondering if it is finished. More art house than mainstream contemporary dance, Pie Charts and Panties is a good one for the fervent ‘Fringe’ dweller. Tweaking to push the professionalism. ADELAIDE FRINGE FESTIVAL: Pie Charts and Panties Performed by Josh Mitchell, Adam Jackson Kathleen Skipp, Ben Leeks, Emma Vaiano. Tickets range from $18 for adults and concession is $15. Note: this performance may be unsuitable for young children. When: 15-21 Mar at 6pm Where: HOLDEN STREET THEATRES - 34 HOLDEN STREET (NEXT TO SOCCER STADIUM) , HINDMARSH 5007 Details: 1 hour/ DISABILITY ACCESS/ PG/ FringeTIX Listing

Jade Wildy

Monday 16 March, 2009

About the author

Jade Wildy is an art theorist and historian based in Adelaide, Australia and she is currently studying for a Masters of Art History at the University of Adelaide. Jade holds a Bachelor of Visual Arts, with a major in ceramics from the University of South Australia. Jade aspires to become an art writer and researcher to pursue her love of visual art and art history. Her current research interests centre around contemporary art with a particular focus on Environmental Art, but she also has a love for psychology, biology and contemporary culture through art, music and dance. Jade enjoys working in her established home studio, as well as fiction and arts writing, and have written numerous reviews for ArtsHub Australia on both visual and performing arts in addition to several book reviews.